Situational Erectile Dysfunction Treatment

Herbal Remedies For Erectile Dysfunction

While many herbal and supplement products claim to treat ED in some way, they have not been scientifically proven. Some of them are not safe.

A patient’s medical or sexual history can help distinguish problems with erection, ejaculation and orgasm (climax). Oral medications that increase blood flow in the penis include vardenafil, sildenafil and Tadalafil. Alprostadil is also available as an injection or suppository.

Causes

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem for men, especially as they age. It can be embarrassing and can lead to a loss of sexual desire. This can affect relationships. It is important to discuss your symptoms with your doctor and determine the cause.

ED is caused when conditions interfere with the blood flow to your genitals. Diabetes, heart disease, vascular issues (such as peripheral neuritis) and certain medications are some of the causes. Depression can also be a factor in a decreased libido.

A psychological approach to ED involves revising the patient’s perspective and expectations around sex and helping them to gradually change behaviours that maintain sexual difficulties. Psychosexual therapy has a positive effect on both the patient and the partner. PDE5 inhibitors are very effective at treating ED. This is especially true when combined with behavioural change. If the initial treatment does not restore erections then the underlying cause must be investigated.

Symptoms

Men with ED typically have problems getting and keeping an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. It affects their quality of life, often resulting in strained relationships and feelings of embarrassment, shame or guilt. They may find it difficult to seek help.

A person with erectile dysfunction is more likely than others to suffer from other health issues, such as diabetes or heart disease. ED can be one of the first signs that these conditions are causing problems with blood flow to the penis.

Your doctor will ask questions about your medical background and your sex history when diagnosing ED. These questions may be embarrassing or private, but are necessary to determine the cause and treatment of your problem. Your doctor may also order lab tests, perform a physical examination and/or refer to a Urologist. The most common treatments for ED are PDE5 inhibitors, oral medications that can improve blood flow to the penis. Other options include vacuum constriction and surgical insertion a penile prothesis.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will examine you and ask about your sexual history to diagnose erectile dysfunction. Your doctor may ask your partner about their experiences. Your doctor will do tests to see if your symptoms are caused by an underlying health problem, such as diabetes, heart disease, low testosterone or high blood pressure.

The injection test uses a medication to stimulate an erection and evaluate how long it lasts. The penile ultrasound test measures blood flow in the area. Blood tests can show the levels of certain hormones, such as testosterone and phosphorous. A urine test can be used to check for a health issue that could cause ED such as diabetes or high blood sugar.

Medications that reduce blood flow to the penis, such as blood pressure medicines and antidepressants, can cause erectile dysfunction. You can improve your symptoms by changing medications or reducing alcohol and other substances. Getting treatment for psychological problems can help, too.

Treatment

Depending on the cause, severity and your personal preferences, your doctor will discuss various treatment options. Some treatments increase erections through increased blood flow to the penis while others reduce symptoms of ED.

Your doctor will start with a physical exam of your genital area, checking your testicles and the nerves in the penis. Your doctor may also want to know your family history of erectile dysfunction. And he or she will ask questions about your sexual history and how your symptoms have changed over time.

Your doctor will also ask you about any medications, including over-the-counter drugs and supplements. He or she will also want to know about any medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, and low testosterone. He or she will also ask whether you have any emotional problems, such as depression or anxiety. He or she may suggest you visit a therapist. And he or she will recommend you exercise, eat healthy foods and avoid substances that can cause erectile dysfunction.